Biomarkers in Nottingham Compensated Cirrhosis Cohort (3CN)

1st May 2012 - ongoing

Status: In Recruitment

Specialism: Liver.

Team: Dr Neil GuhaProfessor Guruprasad AithalDr Rebecca HarrisDr Jane ChalmersAndrea BennettFozia NaushahiTracey WildsmithLouise JamesMelanie LingayaYirga FalconeChris BradleyEleanor Cox.

Compensated Cirrhosis Cohort in Nottingham (3CN study)

Funded by NIHR (2010 to 2018) Liver scarring is caused by a range of insults including alcohol, diabetes, viruses, iron, autoimmune and genetic conditions. Over a period of years, in certain individuals, this can lead to severe scarring of the liver, which is called cirrhosis. In the early stages of cirrhosis symptoms may not be present and routine blood tests can often be normal. This research study aims to find better tests in early liver cirrhosis that assess how the liver is working, predicting complications such as dilated veins in the gullet (varices) and the development of future complications (e.g. fluid in the abdomen, bleeding and confusion). We are following a group of patients with early liver cirrhosis (liver scarring) over a number of years with regular measurements including factors related to lifestyle, anthropometry, nutrition, quality of life, liver scans, blood and urine tests. We have active patient involvement in this study and we held our first open day for patients and researchers in Sep 2012. In total, we will study 200 patients with early liver cirrhosis over a 4 years period.

Compensated Cirrhosis Cohort in Nottingham (3CN MRI study)

Funded by NIHR ( 2010 to 2017)

We are using MRI scans to assess changes related to scarring in the liver and associated blood vessels. MRI scans do not expose patients to radiation and for this study, we do not need to inject intravenous contrast dye. A subgroup of participants enrolled in 3CN (see above) will also be part of this study.

Tests Involved

Patients taking part in the study will be invited back to the Biomedical Research Unit every 6 months to have several tests such as:

  • Research and routine bloods/ urine sample
  • Electrocardiogram (ECG) - an electrical trace of the heart
  • Fibroscan - a scan similar to ultrasound measuring how stiff a person’s liver is
  • Indocyanine Green (ICG) - a test using a harmless green dye, which looks at how well the individual liver cells work
  • Height, weight and blood pressure measurements
  • Also you will be invited to have a MRI scan

Click here for the 3CN Study Patient Perception Video

Patient Experiences

Colin

“The staff ask you how you are and you can talk to them, if you’ve got any problems you can come back to them and get seen and talk to somebody you know about it. It’s great. It’s a load off your mind you’ve got the support there really, you know”

Janette

“You’ll go on to have MRI scans, all manner of things to do with your liver, Fibroscans for your liver. All these things that you know that they can’t possibly miss anything”

“You get a nice cup of tea at the end of it and a lot of friendly banter”

Mary

“Coming to do the research does make me feel comforted if you like, that’s probably the word to use, that if there’s anything wrong, it will be picked up.

But it’s not just for that, it’s if it doesn’t help me, it’s going to help someone else in the future, so yeah, research is important.”

Wendy

“I think I was invited to join, it was totally voluntary, when I was first diagnosed with the liver disease. And I thought, well I don’t know much about it so I’ll go along and see what’s happening.

“So I volunteered from the start. And I’ll be honest with you, I’ve really enjoyed being involved.”

Patient Feedback

“I hope volunteers, like myself, giving their time will get answers to why problems like PBC happens and help towards making a breakthrough to a cure.’’

“I enjoy taking part in the 3CN study it gives me the chance to have additional checks and reassurance on my condition, a feeling of well being, knowing I may be helping others and hopefully finding possible cures for others.’’

“Regular checks I find reassuring which would hopefully show me changes at a early stage.’’

“Opportunity to have tests you would not normally be given e.g MRI, fibro scan.’’

“They’re lovely. Everyone of them are absolutely lovely. They put you at ease straight away, they’ve become friends now, it is nice.”

“They see me every 6 months and give me the usual tests and it’s kind of very routine now, I don’t find it too much of a problem at all.”

“Just give it a go, everyone’s friendly. It does help me cope, it helps you know that you’re not the only person.”

People
Photo Name Bio
neil-guha Dr Neil Guha Dr Neil Guha is a Clinical Associate Professor in Hepatology at the University of Nottingham. He trained at Guy's and St. Thomas's hospitals and began his postgraduate career in hepatology at St. Mary's Hospital, London. His doctoral thesis, awarded by…
guruprasad-aithal Professor Guruprasad Aithal Professor Aithal has been a Consultant Hepatobiliary Physician at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS trust since 2001. He is the Lead Director of the NIHR Nottingham Digestive Diseases Biomedical Research Unit, and the Head of Division for the Nottingham…
dr-rebecca-harris Dr Rebecca Harris
Dr Jane Chalmers
andrea-bennett Andrea Bennett
fozia-naushahi Fozia Naushahi
tracey-wildsmith Tracey Wildsmith
louise-james Louise James
melanie-lingaya Melanie Lingaya
yirga-falcone Yirga Falcone
Chris Bradley
Eleanor Cox