HCV MRI Study

Introduction

New Direct Acting Antiviral (DAAs) treatment for your Hepatitis C. DAAs are taken for just a few weeks, are very effective at getting rid of Hepatitis C and have remarkably few side effects.

We know Hepatitis C causes damage to your liver but how much it changes once the virus has been cured is at present unknown. There is still a risk that your liver may get worse even though the treatment successfully clears the virus, but we have no good way of predicting to whom this will happen. We know the new treatment has an excellent chance of successfully clearing the Hepatitis C so we would like you to have three MRI scans to see how it changes your liver straight away and in the longer term. We hope this will tell us whether people like you need to be monitored after treatment in the future.

Study aim

To assess what effect the new Direct Acting Antiviral (DAA) treatment for Hepatitis C has on the liver in the short and long-term

Who can participate?

  • Men and women aged 18 - 85
  • Must be diagnosed with Hepatitis C
  • Must be offered new DAA treatment for your hepatitis C
  • Must be diagnosed with cirrhosis (usually means a Fibroscan reading above 11.5kPa)

Participation involves:

Study Visit 1

Starts at the Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre (“BRC”) in QMC

(approx 2.5 hour visit)

  • Complete consent form
  • Complete some questions
  • Blood tests
  • Fibroscan
  • One hour MRI scan

Study Visit 2

(at the end of treatment) – at the “BRC”

(approx. 2 hour visit)

  • Blood tests
  • Fibroscan
  • One hour MRI scan

Study Visit 3

(after a year) – starts at the “BRC”

(approx. 2 hour visit)

  • Complete some questions
  • Blood tests
  • Fibroscan
  • One hour MRI scan

What are the benefits for participating?

You will get closer monitoring of your liver than normal and will get to find out how the new DAA treatment changes the liver. We can reimburse any travel costs getting to and from the hospital on these days and also provide a snack lunch or voucher to use in the hospital for after the scan. We hope in future this will tell patients like you how they will get on after treatment and whether they need to keep coming back for monitoring.

Study Contacts

Dr Robert Scott, Research Fellow, rob.scott@nottingham.ac.uk

Dr Naaventhan Palaniyappan, Assistant Professor, msznp1@nottingham.ac.uk

Tracey Wildsmith, Assistant practitioner, tracey.wildsmith@nuh.nhs.uk

Bethany Robinson, Personal Assistant & Research Administrator to Professor Guru Aithal, bethany.robinson@nottingham.ac.uk

Tel: 0115 9709966

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