Gastrointestinal & Liver Disorders

Follow-on RifAximin for the Prevention of recurrence following standard treatment of Infection with

1st June 2019

The 3rd Nottingham IBD Masterclass

24th February 2020

East Midlands Conference Centre, Beeston Lane, Nottingham, NG7 2RJ

The 12th Nottingham Endoscopy Masterclass

24th October - 25th October 2019

East Midlands Conference Centre, Beeston Lane, Nottingham NG7 2RJ

The effects of an iso-energetic low glycemic index diet on liver fat accumulation and gut microbiota

7th August 2019

MAGIC project showcased as innovation case study on NIHR website

18th July 2019

​Functional constipation in childhood is very common. The spectrum ranges from mild to severe and intractable, requiring hospitalisation and possible surgery for management. It can markedly impair quality of life, with further effects on the child’s social functioning.

Despite the prevalence of paediatric constipation, its aetiology is still poorly understood. Transit tests have become a valuable part of the evaluation of children with functional constipation, but are not performed routinely mainly due to the limitations of the current tests. There is an unmet need for a widely applicable, non-ionising radiation method to provide objective measurements of gastrointestinal transit in young patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could provide the solution.

We have developed a new device to measure gut transit in paediatric constipation. The device consists of small, inert mini-capsules made of plastic that, once ingested, can be imaged inside the gastrointestinal tract using MRI, creating a MRI alternative to the radiopaque marker X-ray test to measure gut transit.

We now want to test the ability of the device to measure transit before and after treatment for intractable constipation in 25 children. These results will be compared to 25 age matched healthy controls who do not present with constipation.

MAGIC case study

Follow the MAGIC journey through the study website: www.gastrointestinalmri.org.uk

Research and Excellence Awards 2018/19

11th July 2019

Huge congratulations to Dr Neil Guha and Andy Wragg for being recognised for their hard work at the R&I NUH Research and Excellence Awards 2018/19 on Thursday 11th July 2019. The event took place after the Nottingham BRC Annual Conference and was hosted by Dr Maria Koufali, Managing Director, Research and Innovation.

Dr Neil Guha was presented with the ‘Research Excellence - Impact and Outcome’ award.

Andy Wragg was presented with the ‘Innovation in Patient and Public Involvement/Engagement’ award.

Both awards very well deserved!!

Research and Excellence Awards 2018/19
Research and Excellence Awards 2018/19

A Mechanistic Investigation into Drug and Chemical Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions

10th July 2019

Dr Jane Chalmers accepts BSG Service Development Prize

18th June 2019

Huge congratulations to Dr Jane Chalmers & The Scarred Liver Project team who were awarded the BSG Clinical Services & Standards Committee Service Development Prize 2019 for “the development of a new diagnostic pathway to detect chronic liver disease across primary and secondary care”.

Jane accepted the prize at the BSG Plenary session in June by Dr Cathryn Edwards and Dr Tony Tham.

Well done team!

The article outlining the development and results from the first year of the pathway has been published online in Frontline Gastroenterology

PAG member featured on BBC Panorama

15th June 2019

One of our Patient Advisory Group (PAG) members, Clare Hutton, was featured on the BBC Panorama programme in June. Clare spoke of her life condition. Alcohol-related Liver Disease (ALD), as part of an investigation by the programme about the lack of clarity and knowledge around alcohol units, lack of information on labelling and by the industry in general.

A feature on Clare’s story can be found on the BBC website

GI & Liver Disorders theme at Wonder 2019

15th June 2019

Dr Luca Marciani and the Nottingham BRC GI & Liver Disorders team hosted a fantastic Teddy Bear MRI Scanner and Endoscopy box at the University of Nottingham Wonder community event on Saturday 15th June 2019. The event is ran annually and took place throughout the University of Nottingham campus.

Thank you to everyone who came by to visit our stand and a massive well done to all the team who helped organise.

We hope everyone had a great time!

Here are a few photos of our Endoscopy in a box stand. We had a visit from Pro-Vice Chancellor Professor John Atherton!

The 9th Nottingham Barrett’s Endotherapy Course

13th June - 14th June 2019

Postgraduate Medical Education Centre, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK

Small bowel permeability and associated changes of MRI measures in patients with liver cirrhosis

6th June 2019

Professor Will Irving receives BASL Recognition of Service Award 2019

6th June 2019

Congratulations to Professor Will Irving for receiving the BASL Recognition of Service Award 2019 for his contributions made to Hepatitis C research!

The award was presented to Will at the BASL Basic Science Retreat at The Hayes Conference Centre on 6th June by Professor Matthew Cramp. Well done Will!

Natural History of Histologically-proven Alcohol Related Liver Disease: A systematic review

1st June 2019

Outcomes on the Use of Hemospray in Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeds Secondary to Tumours: Outcomes fro

1st June 2019

“Development of Fixed Dose Combination Products” Workshop Report: Considerations of Gastrointestina

1st June 2019

Comparison of Outcomes with Semi-mechanical and Circular Stapled Intrathoracic Esophagogastric Anast

1st June 2019

Caffeine exposure induces browning features in adipose tissue in vitro and in vivo

1st June 2019

Risk of infection associated with intravenous iron preparations: protocol for updating a systematic

1st June 2019

Effects of pro-/synbiotic supplementation on anthropometric and metabolic indices in overweight or o

1st June 2019

The Efficacy of Reverse Bevel Versus Franseen Needle in Acquiring Adequate Cytology in Gastrointesti

1st June 2019

Service evaluation of faecal immunochemical testing and anaemia for risk stratification in the 2-wee

1st June 2019

The mechanisms of pharmacokinetic food-drug interactions - A perspective from the UNGAP group

1st June 2019

Sofosbuvir/Velpatasvir for 12 Weeks in Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Patients with End-Stage Renal Dise

1st June 2019

The impact of pre-operative intravenous iron on quality of life after colorectal cancer surgery: out

1st June 2019

Association Between Topical Corticosteroid Use and Type 2 Diabetes in Two European Population-Based

1st June 2019

Phase enhanced PSIR T1 weighted imaging improves contrast resolution of the nucleus basalis of Meyne

1st June 2019

Outcomes on the Use of Hemospray in Gastrointestinal Bleeds Post Endoscopic Therapy: Outcomes from t

1st June 2019

Outcomes on the Use of Hemospray in Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeds Secondary to Peptic Ulcers: Prospe

1st June 2019

HSJ Value Awards 2019

23rd May 2019

Huge congratulations to Dr Neil Guha and the Scarred Liver Project team who won the ‘Improving the Value of Diagnostic Services Award’ at the HSJ Value Awards 2019! Angela, Mary, Tracey and Becky attended the awards which took place in Manchester on 23rd May. Well done team!

Liver Investigation: Testing Marker Utility in Steatohepatitis (LITMUS): Assessment & Validation of

20th May 2019

Feasibility studies to investigate the role of ursodeoxycholic acid in the prevention of recurrence

8th May 2019

Shared genetic risk factors across carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions

1st May 2019

Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Proteins Mediate Viral Evasion in Acute and Chronic Hepatitis C Vi

1st May 2019

Amino Acid Substitutions in Genotype 3a Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase Protein Affect Responses to Sof

1st May 2019

Enhancing our understanding of small bowel function using modern imaging techniques

1st May 2019

Carbohydrate-Dependent and Antimicrobial Peptide Defence Mechanisms Against Helicobacter pylori Infe

1st May 2019

A pilot study of visceral fat and its association with adipokines, stool calprotectin and symptoms i

1st May 2019

In search of stool donors: a multicenter study of prior knowledge, perceptions, motivators, and dete

1st May 2019

Magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy in suspected acute upper-GI bleeding versus esophagogastrodu

1st May 2019

Characterization of the urinary metabolic profile of cholangiocarcinoma in a United Kingdom populati

1st May 2019

Interscapular and Perivascular Brown Adipose Tissue Respond Differently to a Short-Term High-Fat Di

1st May 2019

The launch of the Translational Safety Biomarker Pipeline (TransBioLine) Project

17th April 2019

INNOVATIVE MEDICINES INITIATIVE LAUNCHES TRANSLATIONAL SAFETY BIOMARKER PIPELINE PROJECT TO ENABLE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF NOVEL SAFETY BIOMARKERS

The Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) today announced the launch of the Translational Safety Biomarker Pipeline (TransBioLine) Project, a five-year program to generate exploratory and confirmatory data supporting regulatory qualification and acceptance of novel safety biomarkers for five target organ systems (kidney, liver, pancreas, vascular, and central nervous system) for application in drug development.

The TransBioLine Project is a consortium of 27 partners across pharmaceutical companies, small and medium-sized enterprises, and academic institutions from 10 European countries, and is coordinated by the University of Zurich with Pfizer Inc. as the industry lead. It is funded by the IMI Joint Undertaking as a public-private partnership, with a budget of 28M€ and will be active through 2024.

“One of the major gaps in drug development is the lack of qualified safety biomarkers with acceptable precision and accuracy for safety monitoring during clinical development,” said Shashi Ramaiah, Executive Director, Pfizer Drug Safety Research & Development and TransBioLine Lead Scientist. “The TransBioLine Project provides a unique opportunity to access a large expert and knowledge network, including data and samples from clinical trials, to enable the global safety qualification of identified novel biomarkers. Implementing qualified safety biomarkers in early clinical trials will mitigate safety attrition of promising drug candidates and advance projects to clinics through higher-quality and better-informed decision making.”

Michael Merz, Consortium Coordinator, University of Zurich, said, “This is one of the largest public-private partnerships of European and American scientists that focuses on the development and regulatory qualification of new safety biomarkers. These include indicators of tissue damage like liquid biopsy, biomarkers that could facilitate patient stratification, and standardized tests for detection of these biomarkers. These new markers are ultimately expected to not only improve safety of new and approved drugs, but also to contribute to better diagnosis and management of acute and chronic diseases. It is really exciting to see years of enthusiastic preparation translating into this project going forward now.”

When the project ends in 2024, the consortium will have established an infrastructure and processes to continue biomarker research across a comprehensive network of industry, academic institutions, and small and medium-sized enterprises, and it will be able to provide the scientific community, industry and patients with detailed data and information across a large spectrum of advanced safety biomarkers.

Professor Guruprasad Aithal, the Deputy Academic Co-ordinator for TransBioLine and the ‘Drug-induced liver injury (DILI)’ work package lead, said- ‘TransBioLine is an enormous opportunity to turn science into clinical practice to improve safe use of medication. It will boost NIHR Nottingham BRC researchers who have led discoveries in DILI field over the past 2 decades’.

Doctors Jane Grove and Stuart Astbury are contributing to the discovery and evaluation of new tests to identify liver injury early and reduce patient harm; Ms Beth Robinson will be project coordinator for the DILI work package.

Nottingham Transbioline Team
TransBioLine DILI work package team in Nottingham


About the Innovative Medicines Initiative

The Innovative Medicines Initiative is a partnership between the European Union and the European pharmaceutical industry, represented by the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA). It is working to improve health by speeding up the development of the next generation of medicines, particularly in areas where there is an unmet medical or social need.

More info on IMI: www.imi.europa.eu

Contact: info@transbioline.com

Acknowledgement

This project has received funding from the Innovative Medicines Initiative 2 Joint Undertaking under grant agreement No 821283. This Joint Undertaking receives support from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme and EFPIA companies.

Duration and Magnitude of Postoperative Risk of Venous Thromboembolism after Cholecystectomy: A Popu

1st April 2019

Mortality in people with coeliac disease: Long-term follow-up from a Scottish cohort

1st April 2019

Hybrid-biopsy endoscopic mucosal resection: an effective and simple technique for flat colorectal le

1st April 2019

Development and Validation of Confocal Endomicroscopy Diagnostic Criteria for Low-Grade Dysplasia in

1st April 2019

Effect of a Long Bout Versus Short Bouts of Walking on Weight Loss During a Weight-Loss Diet: A Rand

1st April 2019

Young adults’ attitudes to sharing whole-genome sequencing information: a university-based survey

1st April 2019

The impact of preexisting and posttransplant diabetes mellitus on outcomes following liver transplan

1st April 2019

Glycaemic, gastrointestinal and appetite responses to breakfast porridges from ancient cereal grains

1st April 2019

STopping Aminosalicylate Therapy in Inactive Crohn’s Disease (STATIC) Study: A Randomized, Open-labe

1st April 2019

Cross-over Trials in Clinical Research Including N-of-1 trials

25th March - 26th March 2019

De Vere East Midlands Conference Centre, Beeston Lane, Nottingham NG7 2RJ

Could anti-sickness drug end the misery for IBS patients?

24th March 2019

Could a commonly-prescribed anti-sickness drug be the answer for the 1.3 million people in the UK who suffer the pain and misery of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea (IBS-D)?

A nationwide clinical trial, TRITON, led by Professor Robin Spiller in Nottingham will assess the medication ondansetron, which is currently used by doctors to help cancer patients cope with the nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery.

The research will aim to establish whether a much lower dose of the drug could also be a successful treatment for the abdominal pain and urgent bowel movements typically experienced by IBS patients. Read the full press release on the University of Nottingham’s website

The TRITON study has also been featured in the Mail on Sunday Karen Andrews, Patient Advisory Group (PAG) member, shared her story as one of the first patients to benefit from the study.

If you would like to know more about the TRITON study and see if you are eligible to take part, please contact Dr David Gunn: David.Gunn@nottingham.ac.uk 0115 970 9966

Epidemiology and natural history of hepatitis C virus infection among children and young people

1st March 2019

Lactoferrin-loaded Alginate Microparticles to Target Clostridioides difficile infection

1st March 2019

Housing Temperature Modulates the Impact of Diet-Induced Rise in Fat Mass on Adipose Tissue Before a

1st March 2019

Mechanisms underlying effects of kiwifruit on intestinal function shown by MRI in healthy volunteers

1st March 2019

Review article: managing the adverse events caused by anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

1st March 2019

Acceptability, Accuracy, and Safety of Disposable Transnasal Capsule Endoscopy for Barrett’s Esophag

1st March 2019

Association of Pretransplant Renal Function With Liver Graft and Patient Survival After Liver Transp

1st March 2019

Guidelines for Perioperative Care in Elective Colorectal Surgery: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (E

1st March 2019

Glecaprevir/Pibrentasvir in patients with chronic HCV genotype 3 infection: An integrated phase 2/3

1st March 2019

Changing Autonomy in Operative Experience Through UK General Surgery Training: A National Cohort Stu

1st March 2019

ADAPT: An Algorithm Incorporating PRO-C3 Accurately Identifies Patients With NAFLD and Advanced Fibr

1st March 2019

Targeting mu opioid receptors to modulate gastrointestinal function: what have we learnt so far from

1st March 2019

Standardized Method for the Study of Antibody Neutralization of HCV Pseudoparticles (HCVpp)

1st March 2019

Standardized Method for the Study of Antibody Neutralization of HCV Pseudoparticles (HCVpp)

1st March 2019

Professor Robin Spiller featured in The Guardian

18th February 2019

Diverticulitis: the debilitating bowel disorder that’s weakening our guts

About 1% of the UK population is likely to be hospitalised in their lifetime due to the condition. But scientists don’t know what causes it.

“If you do postmortems on people, 40% of 65- to 74-year-olds will have diverticulosis, and many of them will never have had any symptoms.”

Professor Robin Spiller talks to The Guardian all about Diverticulitis and his research. Read the article on The Guardian website

Three years of obeticholic Acid (OCA) therapy results in histological improvements in patients with

1st February 2019

Postoperative inflammation and insulin resistance in relation to body composition, adiposity and car

1st February 2019

Acetarsol in the management of mesalazine-refractory ulcerative proctitis: a tertiary-level care exp

1st February 2019

Virtual chromoendoscopy by using optical enhancement improves the detection of Barrett’s esophagus-a

1st February 2019

Time Out of General Surgery Specialty Training in the UK: A National Database Study

1st February 2019